Environmental Initiatives

Contribution to a Recycling-based Society

The issue of how to efficiently utilize non-renewable resources on the earth is a major challenge for manufacturing industries. For many years, Toyota has been taking initiatives toward establishing a recycling-based society, for example by building a value chain for recycling end-of-life vehicles more than 40 years ago, and promoting activities to utilize resources efficiently and reduce water consumption at production and non-production bases with the aim of improving material productivity. Currently, Toyota is taking various steps to reuse and recycle resources in all four stages of the automobile lifecycle.development/design, production/logistics, sales, and disposal.

Medium- to Long-term 3Rs (Reduce, Reuse, and Recycle) Initiative Focused on End-of-life Vehicles

Medium- to Long-term 3Rs (Reduce, Reuse, and Recycle) Initiative Focused on End-of-life Vehicles

Design and Development

Started Taking Steps to Further Improve Dismantlability through the Introduction of Heavy Machinery for Dismantling

Toyota became the first automaker* to introduce heavy machinery for dismantling, which had come into wide use for removing parts such as wiring harnesses, into its development division, and to begin evaluating dismantlability at the new vehicle development stage, feeding the results back to the design stage. Through this initiative, Toyota aims to improve vehicle dismantlability even further.

*Toyota in-house survey

Introducing heavy machinery for dismantling to remove parts such as wiring harnessesIntroducing heavy machinery for dismantling to remove parts such as wiring harnesses

Production and Logistics

Reduction of Waste Volume

Waste Volumes (Global)

Waste Volumes (Global)

Total Waste Volume and Waste Volume per Unit Produced at TMC

Total Waste Volume and Waste Volume per Unit Produced at TMC

Reduction of Water Consumption

Water Consumption at Vehicle Assembly Plants and Consumption per Unit Produced

Water Consumption at Vehicle Assembly Plants and Consumption per Unit Produced

Promoting Reuse and Recycling to Make Effective Use of the Earth's Limited Resources for the Future

Since Toyota debuted the Prius 16 years ago, it has built its own recovery network to collect end-of-life hybrid vehicle (HV) batteries to be recycled. To date, Toyota has collected 30,000 end-of-life HV batteries and recycled all of them. HV batteries contain precious resources such as nickel, cobalt, and rare earth elements. Toyota has developed and adopted the world’s first technologies to enable these precious resources to be reused in new batteries. It is expected that tens of thousands of end-of-life HV batteries will be generated by the middle of the 2020s. Toyota has also developed the world’s first technologies for reusing or recycling HV batteries. The batteries are reused as replacement batteries or as stationary batteries in photovoltaic power generation systems. Toyota further plans to promote the skillful reuse of batteries from end-of-life vehicles as part of measures to utilize renewable energy in an environmentally considerate manner. When even these reused batteries finally reach the end of their use cycle, their metal parts are recycled into new batteries again. Toyota is always thinking about the importance of effectively using limited resources and is expanding its initiatives to Europe, the U.S. and other countries.

End-of-life hybrid vehicle→Hybrid vehicle battery collection
Since 1997 30,000 End-of-life HV Batteries Collected in Japan, All of Which Were Recycled/Collection and Recycling in Other Countries Where Hybrid Vehicles are Sold
Building Toyota’s Unique Collection Network
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Environmental Protection and Contribution to a Harmony with Nature Society

In order to pass on the beautiful Earth to future generations, Toyota is implementing various environmental protection measures, such as measures to reduce exhaust gas emissions and manage the usage of chemical substances. It is said that approximately 100,000 types of chemical substances are currently being manufactured and sold in the world. Recently, the concept that each corporation must assess the danger of each chemical substance it uses and use it under appropriate control has become mainstream. Each corporation is required to identify the chemical substances it uses and the risks involved, take actions appropriate to the evaluation results and assessed risk, and provide pertinent information to the government and society. Toyota continues to reduce the release of chemical substances covered by the PRTR Law from its plants. Additionally, in cooperation with its supply chain, Toyota is working to reduce the amount of substances of concern (SOCs) contained in its products. Toyota is also aware of the critical need for nature and biodiversity conservation, and is engaged in contributing to a society in harmony with nature through its automotive business and social contribution activities.

Development and Design

Vehicles that Meet Japanese LEV Emission Standards

In FY2012, almost 100% of Toyota vehicles produced were certified as meeting the Ultra-Low Emission Vehicle (U-LEV) or higher standards by the Japanese Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism.

Percentage of Total Production in FY2012 that Qualifies as LEVs Based on 2005 Exhaust Emissions Standards

Percentage of Total Production in FY2012 that Qualifies as LEVs Based on 2005 Exhaust Emissions Standards

Low-Emission Vehicles as a Percentage of Total Production

Low-Emission Vehicles as a Percentage of Total Production

Ensuring Compliance with REACH and Other Global Regulations on Chemical Substances

Since the turn of the century, regulations on chemical substances have been getting tighter all over the world, like the EU ELV1 Directive and REACH2 regulation. These regulations require corporations to collect information on the chemical substance content of their products and manage their supply chains. In response to these chemical regulations, Toyota has built a chemical substance management framework in cooperation with its suppliers. In FY2012, Toyota propagated this framework globally through revision of the Toyota Green Purchasing Guidelines at its regional companies (in Europe, North America, South America, China, Asia, and South Africa, etc.) and supplier meetings.

Toyota Green Purchasing Guidelines (Asian edition)
Toyota Green Purchasing Guidelines (Asian edition)
*1
End of Life Vehicles
*2
Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals

Production and Logistics

VOC Emissions from Paint Reduced to an Average of 20 g/m2 in Body Painting Processes

Since the previous year, Toyota continued efforts to limit use of solvents in washing processes and recapture a larger percentage of solvent and use deionized water (DI water) for washing instead of waterborne cleaning solvent. As a result of these VOC reduction activities, total VOC emissions from Toyota body paint lines averaged 20g/m2 in FY2012.

VOC Emissions Volume in TMC Vehicle Body Painting Processes(Average for All Lines)

VOC Emissions Volume in TMC Vehicle Body Painting Processes(Average for All Lines)

*Volatile Organic Compounds

Initiatives at the New Toyota R&D Center Promoting Harmony with the Natural Environment and Local Communities

In order to develop sustainable next-generation mobility, Toyota is proceeding with plans to construct a new R&D facility in an area straddling Toyota City and Okazaki City. In pursuing this plan, Toyota aims to achieve a balance between technological development and environmental conservation and therefore is working together with people in these communities on a wide variety of activities, as well as actively sharing information.

Goals of the Business Plan

Goals of the Business Plan

Community and Society-based Forestry Initiatives

Forests serve to fix CO2 and provide wood, which is renewable resource, function as biodiversity conservation and soil and water conservation. Toyota conducts its forestry efforts as social contribution activities and as businesses because we believe forests not only contribute to the establishment of a low-carbon society, a recycling-based society and a society in harmony with nature, but are also an essential foundation for communities and society. When we formulated the Forest of Toyota project in 1992, we started by confronting the issues facing forests today. We continue to expand various initiatives aimed at sustainable forestry activities, through "human resources development and partnership with communities" and "establishing a society that maintains harmony with forests."

Toyota's Forestry Activities

Toyota's Forestry Activities
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