Appendix

Organizational Framework

Organizational Framework

A Chronological Table of Toyota's Environmental and Recycling Initiatives

1970
  • Toyota Metal Co., Ltd., ELV (end-of-life vehicle) shredding company, established
1981
  • Material ID marking system introduced
1990
  • Recycling Committee established
  • CFC/HFC collection equipment distributed free of charge to Toyota service shops across Japan
1991
  • TSOP (Toyota Super Olefin Polymer), a new material with outstanding recyclability, developed and put to practical use
  • Bumper recycling system covering Western Tokyo area launched
1994
  • Technology for recycling painted bumpers into new bumpers developed and put into practical use
1995
  • Toyota joins with Toyota Metal Co., Ltd., to develop the world's first high-precision dry sorting process; operation of ASR (automobile shredder residue) recycling pilot plant begins
  • Toyota develops and applies technologies to sort urethane and fiber from ASR and recycle them as RSPP (Recycled Sound-Proofing Products), a soundproofing material used in vehicles
  • Toyota Automobile Dismantling Manual compiled and distributed
1996
  • Technology to recycle polyurethane bumpers developed
  • Bumper recycling system expanded to cover all of Japan
  • Device for concentration and separation of engine coolants to be reused as fuel developed and commercialized
1997
  • Recycling of polyurethane bumpers begins; materials used for battery trays and other parts
  • Device for concentration and separation of LLC to be reused as fuel distributed free of charge to dealers across Japan
  • Recoverability prior assessment system launched
  • New recycling technology developed, comprising a twin-screw reactive extruder processing system that recycles painted bumpers into new bumpers
  • Technology developed to recycle waste rubber into products of the same quality as new material
  • Use of lead in wire harness coverings discontinued
1998
  • Elimination of lead in electro-deposited coatings begins
  • Toyota Recycling Voluntary Action plan established to strengthen Toyota's commitment to vehicle recovery
  • Recycling plant set up inside Toyota Metal Co., Ltd.
1999
  • Use of soundproofing material, RSPP, expanded to 12 vehicle series
  • New TSOP with higher rigidity and flexibility developed and put to practical use
2000
  • Drafted the Toyota Japanese Dealer Environmental Guidelines and overall action plan for vehicle dealers
  • Started trials on sale of used parts in Aichi, Japan
  • Completed the development of technology for a commercial system to achieve 90% recovery rate
2001
  • Established the Automobile Recycle Technical Center inside Toyota Metal Co., Ltd.
  • Promoted the reuse of automobile parts nationwide (using e-commerce))
2002
  • Began operation of demonstration plant for ASR thermal recycling
2003
  • Launched sales of the new Raum, which incorporates the concept of design for recycling (DfR)
  • Establishment of three designated corporations in response to Japan's Automobile Recycling Law
  • ASR Recycling Plant establishes that a 95% vehicle recovery rate is possible
2004
  • In preparation of Japan's Automobile Recycling Law coming into effect:
  • Nationwide recycling and processing structures constructed for three designated items
  • Japan Auto Recycling Partnership established
  • TH Team for ASR recycling established
  • Recycling fees for Toyota vehicles announced
2005
  • Japan's Automobile Recycling Law comes into effect (January)
2006
  • ELV Collection Network developed in 22 European Union member nations.
2007
  • Achieved 70% of ASR recycling rate specified in 2015 legal standards (76%)
2008
  • Resource Recycling Committee established
  • No. of vehicles using Recycled Sound-Proofing Products (RSPP) reaches 15 million.
2009
  • High Voltage battery collection and recycling system upgraded.
  • Start using raw materials made of end of life vehicle bumpers for new vehicle production parts.
2010
  • The world's first "battery to battery" recycling business began operations. This business extracts nickel from end-of-life hybrid vehicle batteries and reuses it in new batteries.