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  Executive Message
Business Principles
Compliance
 
Realization of a Sustainable Society
It is my honor and pleasure to announce the publication of Toyota's Environmental & Social Report 2003. Toyota has been releasing environmental reports since 1998 as a tool for disclosing information to the public and promoting the firm establishment of environmental management within the company. Since the very first Environmental Report, Toyota has made the environment a top-priority management issue. In the Global Vision 2010 announced last year, Toyota's endeavor to be a leader of global regeneration is defined as an absolute prerequisite to maintain the support of its many customers around the world in the 21st century amidst the advent of a recycling-oriented society.
In the past five years Toyota has achieved a number of significant results, including expansion of its hybrid and ultra-low emissions vehicle lineup, limited marketing of fuel cell hybrid vehicles, realization of zero landfill waste, achievement of the FY2005 goal of 5% reduction in CO
2 emissions compared to 1990 levels, advancement of recyclable designs, and introduction of consolidated environmental management worldwide.
Toyota is not, however, completely satisfied with the current situation. It is important to review every detail of Toyota's activities throughout the world from an environmental perspective, while at the same time scrutinizing environmental action taken over the entire product lifecycle—from development and design to production, use, and disposal—and constantly ensuring that the highest levels of environmental management are implemented in every region and area of activity.
By balancing our social and economic initiatives, in addition to thorough implementation of the above-mentioned environmental management, Toyota hopes to contribute to the realization of a sustainable society.
Currently, the world population is said to be approximately 6.1 billion people, whereas the number of automobiles is 740 million. Although there is developing automobile use in many regions of the world, those who are able to enjoy the benefits of mobility still remain a minority. Providing many more people with the convenience of automobiles as a means of mobility will continue to be an important mission for automakers in the 21st century.
Needless to say, however, the expansion of automobile use will have a significant impact on the environment. In other words, there is no future for the automotive industry without the promotion of environmental technology. Toyota is convinced that only companies that succeed in this area will be acceptable to society. The development of environment-related technology is one of Toyota's key societal responsibilities. Each Toyota employee should bear in mind that achieving concrete results in this area is a fundamental aspect of Toyota's business activities.

August 2003

Fujio Cho
President, Toyota Motor Corporation Chairman, Toyota Environmental Committee
 
Environmental & Social Report 2003
 This year, Toyota has changed the title of its environmental report to Environmental & Social Report in line with an expansion of the scope of information included.
In FY2002, Toyota's main environmental achievements were the expansion of the lineup of vehicles that comply with the government fleet standards under the Law on Promoting Green Purchasing, the start of limited marketing of fuel cell hybrid vehicles, a reduction in combustible waste to one-third of 1990 levels, the start of test operation at the ASR Recycling and Recovery Pilot Plant, incorporation of research results from the Automobile Recycle Technical Center into vehicles, and the creation of systems to promote consolidated environmental management that includes promotion of risk management focusing on overseas affiliates.
This year's report also describes Toyota's activities from a social aspect, with respect to stakeholders, including customers, society, suppliers and employees. It explains Toyota's management principles and thinking on compliance as well as providing information on economic performance.
Although the topics addressed in this report are by no means exhaustive of Toyota's corporate responsibility toward society, they will enable readers to gain a deeper understanding of Toyota's thinking about corporate social responsibility, particularly concerning the environment, and some of the specific actions that have been taken to fulfill those responsibilities.
In the future, Toyota plans to continue enhancing disclosure of information concerning both the environmental and social aspects of its activities. Toyota looks forward to receiving your open and honest opinions concerning this report and its content.

August 2003

Kosuke Shiramizu
Executive Vice President,
Member of the Board in Charge of Environmental Issues,
Toyota Motor Corporation
 
 
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